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They Did.

I Can.

We Will.

The Down syndrome community has already fought – and won – many significant battles. Because of these thousands of victories – in policy, in doctors’ offices, in school districts, in the media, and in our own lives – people with Down syndrome are living more independently and for longer than ever before.

But there are still battles to be won. LuMind IDSC invites you and your family to become part of the next fight: for research that will give us answers.

Because they did, I can, and we will advance research. Scientific research today will be the foundation of a healthy and independent future for people with Down syndrome.

WHY RESEARCH? WHY NOW?

  • Life expectancy for adults with Down syndrome has increased from age 10 in the 1960s to age 25 in the 1980s to age 65+ today. The world has never seen an entire generation of elderly people with Down syndrome – until now!
  • According to researchers, almost 60% of children with Down syndrome have abnormal sleep habits by age 4, with the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea nearing 100% by adulthood. Good sleep is essential to so many aspects of health and happiness that a wide variety of sleep apnea solutions will be critical in coming years.
  • Researchers estimate that the lifetime risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is more than 90%, and is the leading cause of death for adults with Down syndrome. Compounding the prevalence of AD in the Down syndrome community is the shockingly early onset of dementia symptoms, typically around age 55.
FIND OUT MORE
Researchers estimate that the lifetime risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is more than 90%, and is the leading cause of death for adults with Down syndrome.
Life expectancy for adults with Down syndrome has increased from age 10 in the 1960s to age 25 in the 1980s to age 65+ today.
Between 1979 and 2003, the number of babies born with Down syndrome increased by about 30%.

WHAT'S YOUR DS MOMENT?

Watch families, caregivers and experts discuss the importance of getting involved in research:

Michelle Sullivan: mother and athlete.

CURIOUS ABOUT THE SCIENCE, RESOURCES AND WAYS TO GET INVOLVED?

ADDITIONAL READING

Research in Action

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